This is a 50-question sample Wonderlic® Quiz which provides questions similar to that of the real test.  You will have 12 minutes (720 seconds) to answer 50 questions.  You score 1 point for each correct answer.  Your time will start as soon as the next page loads.  Good luck!

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Ready to start the challenge? The 50 question Wonderlic test is used by many organizations for an initial pre-screening of job candidates. Businesses, the military, and schools have been known to use it. Most famously, the Wonderlic is used by scouts in the National Football League as a part of the pre-draft analysis at the combine every year in Indianapolis. While scouts do not weigh the test results as critically as a player’s physical ability such as size, speed and strength, the test gives NFL front office personnel a perspective on the cognitive ability of the player that they are considering bringing into their organization.

The test is timed and is comprised of 50 questions. Questions range in types across reasoning, grammar, math, and geometry. You may have to determine the speed of a car, calculate how much product a store sold in a given time period, recall a word meaning, do an analogy, or use deductive reasoning to solve a world problem. The challenge is that the test is timed at 12 minutes, so you have think and move fast!

The average score is generally referenced as 20. At that NFL scouting combine there have been several notable scores both above and below this benchmark. By position group, the top performers generally are offensive tackles and centers, with the lowest average performers being fullbacks and wide receivers. Notable current player scores include Calvin Johnson at 41, Eli Manning at 39, Ryan Fitzpatrick at 48, and Tony Romo with a 37.

Scouts place an emphasis on having a quarterback score at least at 21, just above the average of 20. There is much debate over the merit of the Wonderlic test on draft position and on a player’s ability to succeed in the NFL. While on the surface it seems like an irrelevant gauge of how well a player can tackle, run or block, it does give a baseline to NFL scouts as far as the cognitive ability a prospect may have in today’s quick thinking style of game.